Global Wireless News

LiveTag is out to make dumb objects smart

Thursday, August 16, 2018

"Smart" internet-connected devices could indeed make life easier for us, but the things do typically have to be equipped with battery-powered electronics. That may not necessarily be the case for much longer, however, if the Wi-Fi-based LiveTag system reaches fruition. Developed by a team at the University of California San Diego, the system incorporates simple low-cost tags that can be adhered to everyday non-electronic objects. Those tags consist of patterns of copper foil that are printed onto a flexible paper-like substrate -- they don't have any batteries, chips or electronic components.

UC San Diego developing biosensor that monitors alcohol in people struggling with substance abuse

Tuesday, May 8, 2018

UC San Diego has made an important technical advance in its effort to develop a tiny biosensor that could be placed beneath a person's skin for long-term alcohol monitoring in patients being treated for substance abuse. A team led by engineer Drew Hall created a prototype of the sensor that worked when it was placed in a simulated environment in the laboratory. The device now has to be refined so that it can be tested in live animals and, eventually, humans.

New Injectable Alcohol Biosensor Monitors BAC

Friday, April 20, 2018

For recovering alcoholics, accountability remains one of the most elusive pitfalls of long term sobriety. It's easy to backslide into bad habits when no one is watching. But thanks to UC San Diego's Jacobs School of Engineering, there is hope on the horizon for long term sober accountability. They are developing an injectable alcohol biosensor chip that continuously monitors blood alcohol content (BAC).

Skin Sensor Might Someday Track Alcoholics' Booze Intake

Wednesday, April 18, 2018

An injectable sensor that could provide ongoing monitoring of the alcohol intake of people receiving addiction treatment is in development. The miniature biosensor would be placed just beneath the skin surface and be powered wirelessly by a wearable device, such as a smartwatch or patch, the University of California, San Diego engineers explained. "The ultimate goal of this work is to develop a routine, unobtrusive alcohol and drug monitoring device for patients in substance abuse treatment programs," project leader Drew Hall said in a university news release.

This Implantable Chip Could Monitor Alcohol Intake

Tuesday, April 17, 2018

People arrested for DUIs or other alcohol-related offenses are sometimes ordered to wear so-called SCRAM (secure continuous remote alcohol monitoring) bracelets. The device, usually worn on the ankle, can detect alcohol consumption through the skin. Patients in rehab programs often submit to alcohol monitoring as well, often through Breathalyzers or blood tests. But SCRAM bracelets are clunky and sometimes embarrassing, and tests require regular visits. A team of scientists from UC San Diego has come up with a potential alternative: a tiny implantable chip.

Injectable chip measures alcohol consumption

Wednesday, April 11, 2018

There may be a new -- if perhaps somewhat Big Brother-like -- method of monitoring the alcohol intake of people in substance abuse treatment programs. Led by Prof. Drew Hall, scientists at the University of California San Diego have developed an alcohol-sensing chip that can be implanted in the body. The chip is designed to be injected under the skin, where it will sit in the interstitial fluid that surrounds the cells. The chip uses very little power (which it draws from the watch's RF signals) and takes just three seconds to conduct one measurement.

The next breathalyzer may be a chip implanted under your skin

Wednesday, April 11, 2018

A group of engineers at the University of California, San Diego, created a prototype of a chip, meant to be injected under the skin, that could eventually be helpful for people who are in treatment for alcohol abuse. At just one millimeter across, it's a fraction the size of a penny, which means it would be a lot less bulky than current alcohol-monitoring bracelets. Researchers say it can be more accurate than a breathalyzer test, and it's less invasive than a blood test.

Tiny Alcohol Monitor Sits Just Beneath the Skin

Tuesday, April 10, 2018

A tiny chip implanted just under the skin could be the Breathalyzer of the future. Researchers from the University of California San Diego reported today that they had created a tiny chip that can read levels of alcohol in the body and relay that information to a smartwatch. It could be an alternative to traditional means of detecting whether someone has been drinking, and offers users the ability to monitor their blood-alcohol levels in real-time. The chip measures about a cubic millimeter in size and is powered by a smartwatch or external patch, meaning it doesn't need a battery.

How This Wireless Biosensor Chip Injected Under The Skin Can Monitor Alcohol Levels

Tuesday, April 10, 2018

Engineers from the University of California San Diego say they've developed a wireless biosensor chip that could be injected beneath the skin for continuous, long-term alcohol monitoring. The low power chip can be powered wirelessly through a wearable device and could make it easier for patients to follow a prescribed course of tracking over an extended period of time as well as change the way substance abuse disorders are diagnosed, monitored and treated. The biosensor chip, which is in an early prototyping stage, is one cubic millimeter in size and can be injected under the skin.

The Power of Sweat

Tuesday, October 10, 2017

A new, wearable device developed by a team of California researchers shows perspiration can truly be powerful.

Chaos could provide the key to enhanced wireless communications

Tuesday, August 16, 2016

Chaos, somewhat ironically, has one clear attribute: random-like, apparently unpredictable, behavior. However recent work shows that that unpredictable behavior could provide the key to effective and efficient wireless communications.

Looking at 5G from a microwave perspective

Friday, March 4, 2016

by Joe Bush

With 5G looming large on the horizon, it’s an exciting time to be an RF engineer. As we embark on the road to 5G (the next generation wireless communications system), there are countless challenges and opportunities emerging for the engineering community. Thomas Cameron, CTO, Communications Infrastructure, Analog Devices explains more.

6 areas for future small cell development

Tuesday, February 16, 2016

Things are finally looking rosier for small cells, as the technology has started to gain its long-awaited deployment momentum. Small Cell Forum said in a recent report that 2015 was a “turning point year” for the technology, with larger deployments coming online and the industry getting a better handle on deployment issues that have dogged small cell scalability.

Nexius partners with RCR Wireless News to create Proof of Concept Lab and Testing Program for network operators and enterprise sector buyers

Tuesday, February 2, 2016

ALLEN, TEXAS – Nexius, specializing in delivering end-to-end network services and business intelligence solutions, today announced a new partnership with RCR Wireless News to create an Independent Proof of Concept Lab and Testing Program for network operators and enterprise sector buyers.

Microsoft successfully tests underwater data center

Tuesday, February 2, 2016

by Sean Kinney

Project Natick is Microsoft’s effort to make a more efficient, better located data center under the sea

Cloud computing heavyweight Microsoft, looking to boost the operational efficiency of data centers while physically locating content closer to users, has tested running servers sealed in a pod located underwater off the coast of California.

How the ‘digitization of everything’ will become a reality

Thursday, January 14, 2016

by Patrick Nelson

The combination of products with “built-in smart technology” with consumers’ expectations of a “best-in-class experience” means mundane, manually performed tasks will be replaced by new “exciting and indispensable services,” says Accenture innovation division Fjord in two reports. Fjord reckons we’re on the cusp of a new way of doing things. That includes the fact that user requirements will be addressed dynamically, contextually, and in real-time—more so than ever before.

Network

How to Ease the Installation Challenge of the Smart Home with Energy Harvesting

Wednesday, January 13, 2016

Contributed By Publitek Marketing Communications

GreatCall Launches First Wearable Device That Connects Activity Tracking With Nationwide Mobile Safety Service for Active Aging / Introducing the Lively Wearable by GreatCall

Wednesday, January 6, 2016

GreatCall Inc., the leader in creating usable technology for active aging, brings family caregivers peace of mind and older adults a new level of empowerment by combining the health benefits of an activity tracker with the safety advantages of a mobile emergency response service. The introduction of the Lively Wearable by GreatCall is the first step in the development of a wearable health hub for the active aging market.

Next-Gen Wi-Fi Will Actually Connect the Internet of Things

Monday, January 4, 2016

by Brian Barrett

THERE ARE PLENTY of blockades between now and the connected-device future that’s been so long on the horizon. One of these is Wi-Fi, which has limitations that keep connected devices from connecting quite as efficiently as they could. Now, there’s a plan in place to fix it.

Brand new Wi-Fi standard reaches twice as far and uses less power

Monday, January 4, 2016

by Zach Epstein

The show floor at the annual Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas is packed with all sorts of flashy new consumer devices that are meant to grab people’s attention, but one of the biggest announcements from this year’s show isn’t an HDTV, a drone or a hoverboard. It’s also not a “smart” device, which will again be the focus of CES this year as we push closer toward a time when “Internet of Things” gadgets proliferate and infiltrate every corner of our homes and offices.

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