Global Wireless News

Cheap, Flexible, Battery-Free Tags to Control Your IoT Devices

Tuesday, September 11, 2018

The Internet of Things is a bit of a double-edged sword. On the one hand, outfitting your home with IoT devices can make a lot of tasks more convenient. But, on the other hand, IoT devices get expensive quickly when every device and control needs a microcontroller and WiFi capability. These new smart tags could, potentially, reduce that cost dramatically by providing control with simple, incredibly inexpensive, printable circuits.

Smart Tags Add Touch Controls to Ordinary Objects

Monday, August 27, 2018

Despite the modern world's fixation with touchscreen smartphones and tablets, most homes and businesses remain cluttered with objects that lack any digital interfaces. Now, those ordinary objects could get an upgrade thanks to new smart tags that harness reflected Wi-Fi signals to add touch-based controls to any surface. The new LiveTag technology allows for interactive controls or keypads that can stick onto objects, walls, or even clothing, and let people remotely operate music players or receive hydration reminders based on the amount of liquid remaining in a water bottle.

These Tags Convert Just About Anything Into a Smart Device

Monday, August 20, 2018

The revolution of smart devices marches on as researchers have made printable tags that mirror some functionality of standard smart gadgets. While that might sound like a major leap at first, it obviously comes with some important caveats. You can't just slap these on a TV and get Hulu, but they do allow you to use them for some basic home programming. The tags work by reflecting WiFi signals to a device that's configured to look for them. By slapping the reflectors on whatever, you can turn them and your phone into a WiFi radar system.

LiveTag is out to make dumb objects smart

Thursday, August 16, 2018

"Smart" internet-connected devices could indeed make life easier for us, but the things do typically have to be equipped with battery-powered electronics. That may not necessarily be the case for much longer, however, if the Wi-Fi-based LiveTag system reaches fruition. Developed by a team at the University of California San Diego, the system incorporates simple low-cost tags that can be adhered to everyday non-electronic objects. Those tags consist of patterns of copper foil that are printed onto a flexible paper-like substrate -- they don't have any batteries, chips or electronic components.

UC San Diego developing biosensor that monitors alcohol in people struggling with substance abuse

Tuesday, May 8, 2018

UC San Diego has made an important technical advance in its effort to develop a tiny biosensor that could be placed beneath a person's skin for long-term alcohol monitoring in patients being treated for substance abuse. A team led by engineer Drew Hall created a prototype of the sensor that worked when it was placed in a simulated environment in the laboratory. The device now has to be refined so that it can be tested in live animals and, eventually, humans.

New Injectable Alcohol Biosensor Monitors BAC

Friday, April 20, 2018

For recovering alcoholics, accountability remains one of the most elusive pitfalls of long term sobriety. It's easy to backslide into bad habits when no one is watching. But thanks to UC San Diego's Jacobs School of Engineering, there is hope on the horizon for long term sober accountability. They are developing an injectable alcohol biosensor chip that continuously monitors blood alcohol content (BAC).

Skin Sensor Might Someday Track Alcoholics' Booze Intake

Wednesday, April 18, 2018

An injectable sensor that could provide ongoing monitoring of the alcohol intake of people receiving addiction treatment is in development. The miniature biosensor would be placed just beneath the skin surface and be powered wirelessly by a wearable device, such as a smartwatch or patch, the University of California, San Diego engineers explained. "The ultimate goal of this work is to develop a routine, unobtrusive alcohol and drug monitoring device for patients in substance abuse treatment programs," project leader Drew Hall said in a university news release.

This Implantable Chip Could Monitor Alcohol Intake

Tuesday, April 17, 2018

People arrested for DUIs or other alcohol-related offenses are sometimes ordered to wear so-called SCRAM (secure continuous remote alcohol monitoring) bracelets. The device, usually worn on the ankle, can detect alcohol consumption through the skin. Patients in rehab programs often submit to alcohol monitoring as well, often through Breathalyzers or blood tests. But SCRAM bracelets are clunky and sometimes embarrassing, and tests require regular visits. A team of scientists from UC San Diego has come up with a potential alternative: a tiny implantable chip.

Injectable chip measures alcohol consumption

Wednesday, April 11, 2018

There may be a new -- if perhaps somewhat Big Brother-like -- method of monitoring the alcohol intake of people in substance abuse treatment programs. Led by Prof. Drew Hall, scientists at the University of California San Diego have developed an alcohol-sensing chip that can be implanted in the body. The chip is designed to be injected under the skin, where it will sit in the interstitial fluid that surrounds the cells. The chip uses very little power (which it draws from the watch's RF signals) and takes just three seconds to conduct one measurement.

The next breathalyzer may be a chip implanted under your skin

Wednesday, April 11, 2018

A group of engineers at the University of California, San Diego, created a prototype of a chip, meant to be injected under the skin, that could eventually be helpful for people who are in treatment for alcohol abuse. At just one millimeter across, it's a fraction the size of a penny, which means it would be a lot less bulky than current alcohol-monitoring bracelets. Researchers say it can be more accurate than a breathalyzer test, and it's less invasive than a blood test.

Technology meets society: New app helps seniors live better

Friday, November 20, 2015

A new technological solution developed by researchers from the University of Notre Dame is aimed at enhancing the physical health, vitality and brain fitness of seniors residing in independent living communities.

Renesas Electronics Announces World’s First Sub-Gigahertz Band Wireless Solutions for CTBU Compliant with Wi-SUN Standard for Home Networks Supporting Smart Meters and HEMS Devices

Friday, November 20, 2015

by Jessica Kerr

Renesas Electronics Corporation (TSE: 6723), a premier supplier of advanced semiconductor solutions, today announced the release of two new sub-gigahertz band wireless communication solutions for devices supporting Wi-SUN, which are the world’s first containing automatic dual-address filtering function that will help reduce the time required to develop home energy management systems (HEMS), smart meters, and other devices.

Overcoming Border Security Challenges with Wireless Communications

Monday, November 16, 2015

by Yossie Segal

Our nation's borders are often characterized by long distance coverage of changing border conditions and challenges, from open borders to sealed borders, secured and unsecured perimeters, inhabited and uninhabited areas, hostile environments and ever changing terrain. They also require constant manpower. Commanding such vast distances and challenges depends, among other things, on reliable and resilient line of communications built to withstand situations that arise along the borders.

Google's Internet Balloon Project Takes Flight

Sunday, November 15, 2015

by Dan Jones

Google's 4G LTE "Project Loon" balloon scheme is going into orbit above Indonesia to test to see if the search giant can provide Internet connectivity from the skies for one of the most underserved countries in the world.

Hong Kong, Huawei demo FDD-TDD 4.5G netword

Thursday, November 5, 2015

Mobile operators in Hong Kong include HKT, Three, China Mobile and SmarTone. Earlier this year, HKT and Huawei demonstrated the world's first IP-RAN based 3CC CA with a single-user peak rate of 450Mbps. 3 Hong Kong and Huawei on Wednesday announced they achieved a 1 Gbps peak connection speed on a hybrid FDD/TDD network in a demonstration of what Huawei calls "4.5G" technology.

The new wave in wireless communication

Tuesday, November 3, 2015

While cat videos, memes and the various other clips and images shared via the Internet provide endless hours of viewing pleasure, they are creating a stress on conventional wireless networks. They produce a huge demand for wireless capacity that cannot be satisfied simply with increases to the existing spectrum.

ITU Assembly endorses IMT process for timely development of 5G mobile systems

Thursday, October 29, 2015

The Radiocommunication Assembly today endorsed a Resolution that establishes the roadmap for the development of 5G mobile and the term that will apply to it: “IMT-2020”. The overall “Vision” for 5G systems, along with the goals, process and timeline for its development, is now in place.

The detailed technical performance requirements for the radio systems to support 5G will be developed, in close collaboration with industry and national and regional standards organizations, following the stringent timelines defined by ITU.

Internet Of Things: 10 Most Innovative Companies

Friday, October 23, 2015

Top 10 Most Innovative Companies in the Internet of Things is an update of our previous Top 10 Companies In Internet of Things In 2015 (released in March 2015).

There is no “next big thing”. Smart, embedded, connected sensors, smart homes, connected cars, digital healthcare, smart cities, are already here. Next is now. From chipsets manufacturers to internet providers, from cloud companies to Big Data analytics platforms, the IoT ecosystem is ready.

UPDATE: INTERNET OF THINGS: 10 MOST INNOVATIVE COMPANIES

IBM Is Collaborating With Apple On Artificial Intelligence Health Program

Wednesday, October 21, 2015

Experts in health care and information technology agree on the future’s biggest opportunity: the creation of a new computational model that will link together all of the massive computers that now hold medical information. The question remains: who will build it and how?

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