Global Wireless News

UC San Diego developing biosensor that monitors alcohol in people struggling with substance abuse

Tuesday, May 8, 2018

UC San Diego has made an important technical advance in its effort to develop a tiny biosensor that could be placed beneath a person's skin for long-term alcohol monitoring in patients being treated for substance abuse. A team led by engineer Drew Hall created a prototype of the sensor that worked when it was placed in a simulated environment in the laboratory. The device now has to be refined so that it can be tested in live animals and, eventually, humans.

New Injectable Alcohol Biosensor Monitors BAC

Friday, April 20, 2018

For recovering alcoholics, accountability remains one of the most elusive pitfalls of long term sobriety. It's easy to backslide into bad habits when no one is watching. But thanks to UC San Diego's Jacobs School of Engineering, there is hope on the horizon for long term sober accountability. They are developing an injectable alcohol biosensor chip that continuously monitors blood alcohol content (BAC).

Skin Sensor Might Someday Track Alcoholics' Booze Intake

Wednesday, April 18, 2018

An injectable sensor that could provide ongoing monitoring of the alcohol intake of people receiving addiction treatment is in development. The miniature biosensor would be placed just beneath the skin surface and be powered wirelessly by a wearable device, such as a smartwatch or patch, the University of California, San Diego engineers explained. "The ultimate goal of this work is to develop a routine, unobtrusive alcohol and drug monitoring device for patients in substance abuse treatment programs," project leader Drew Hall said in a university news release.

This Implantable Chip Could Monitor Alcohol Intake

Tuesday, April 17, 2018

People arrested for DUIs or other alcohol-related offenses are sometimes ordered to wear so-called SCRAM (secure continuous remote alcohol monitoring) bracelets. The device, usually worn on the ankle, can detect alcohol consumption through the skin. Patients in rehab programs often submit to alcohol monitoring as well, often through Breathalyzers or blood tests. But SCRAM bracelets are clunky and sometimes embarrassing, and tests require regular visits. A team of scientists from UC San Diego has come up with a potential alternative: a tiny implantable chip.

Injectable chip measures alcohol consumption

Wednesday, April 11, 2018

There may be a new -- if perhaps somewhat Big Brother-like -- method of monitoring the alcohol intake of people in substance abuse treatment programs. Led by Prof. Drew Hall, scientists at the University of California San Diego have developed an alcohol-sensing chip that can be implanted in the body. The chip is designed to be injected under the skin, where it will sit in the interstitial fluid that surrounds the cells. The chip uses very little power (which it draws from the watch's RF signals) and takes just three seconds to conduct one measurement.

The next breathalyzer may be a chip implanted under your skin

Wednesday, April 11, 2018

A group of engineers at the University of California, San Diego, created a prototype of a chip, meant to be injected under the skin, that could eventually be helpful for people who are in treatment for alcohol abuse. At just one millimeter across, it's a fraction the size of a penny, which means it would be a lot less bulky than current alcohol-monitoring bracelets. Researchers say it can be more accurate than a breathalyzer test, and it's less invasive than a blood test.

Tiny Alcohol Monitor Sits Just Beneath the Skin

Tuesday, April 10, 2018

A tiny chip implanted just under the skin could be the Breathalyzer of the future. Researchers from the University of California San Diego reported today that they had created a tiny chip that can read levels of alcohol in the body and relay that information to a smartwatch. It could be an alternative to traditional means of detecting whether someone has been drinking, and offers users the ability to monitor their blood-alcohol levels in real-time. The chip measures about a cubic millimeter in size and is powered by a smartwatch or external patch, meaning it doesn't need a battery.

How This Wireless Biosensor Chip Injected Under The Skin Can Monitor Alcohol Levels

Tuesday, April 10, 2018

Engineers from the University of California San Diego say they've developed a wireless biosensor chip that could be injected beneath the skin for continuous, long-term alcohol monitoring. The low power chip can be powered wirelessly through a wearable device and could make it easier for patients to follow a prescribed course of tracking over an extended period of time as well as change the way substance abuse disorders are diagnosed, monitored and treated. The biosensor chip, which is in an early prototyping stage, is one cubic millimeter in size and can be injected under the skin.

The Power of Sweat

Tuesday, October 10, 2017

A new, wearable device developed by a team of California researchers shows perspiration can truly be powerful.

IDT Announces Microwave and Millimeter Wave Products, Accelerating Growth in Active Antenna Systems

Wednesday, September 20, 2017

Integrated Device Technology, Inc. (IDT®) (NASDAQ:IDTI) today announced that it is sampling a portfolio of millimeter wave beamformer products for 5G next-generation communications systems. These products accelerate IDT's growth in the RF market and consolidate its position as a leading supplier of RF and millimeter wave (mmWave) products for wireless infrastructure.

5 Key lessons for Indian smart cities from Sweden

Tuesday, October 20, 2015

India and Sweden have a lot in common in terms of demography, people, culture and implementation of modern technology. While the sub-continent is looking at building smart cities, Sweden's indigenous knowledge of its smart-city building model called 'Symbiocities' can actually transfer best practices to make the smart cities in the country with economically viable infrastructures providing optimum benefit for the dwellers. There are a few key lessons that India can take away from Symbiocities that Sweden has already built since years.

In the future we will wear robots,' says MIT 'bionic' professor

Tuesday, October 20, 2015

by Rachel Barnes

Hugh Herr, who heads the Biomechatronics research group at the MIT Media Lab and has been dubbed 'the leader of the Bionic Age', took to the stage at DigitasLBi's New Front conference to discuss the potential of a "transcendent human."

Herr told the story of his transformation from double amputee after a climbing accident, to exceeding what he was previously physically capable of on the rock face.

"With technology I am released from these shackles of disability - we will end disability in this century."

Straight Path aims to demonstrate viability of 5G at 39 GHz within 12-18 months

Saturday, October 17, 2015

by Monica Alleven

Straight Path, which is developing a 5G phased-array transceiver prototype in the 39 GHz band, expects to complete its work within 12 to 18 months and hopes the prototype will demonstrate the viability of using 39 GHz for 5G services.

'LISTEN': Your smart home is LISTENing to you

Monday, October 12, 2015

by Volker Buddensiek

LISTEN is a new hands-free system for controlling smart home applications that is being developed as part of a new EU project. Partners from Germany, Greece and Italy are working together on a natural language interface to control Internet services as well as functions in intelligent homes.

Healthcare Goes High-Tech

Friday, October 9, 2015

By Josh Baxt

Eric Topol is not satisfied with the health care status quo. The practicing cardiologist and director of the Scripps Translational Science Institute has seen the future of medicine and, in his view, we’re not getting there fast enough.

“We all recognize that the world has gone wireless,” Topol says. “Before we know it, 80 percent of adults will have a smartphone with broadband access. This digital infrastructure is moving at warp speed, but medicine basically hasn’t gotten out of the parking lot.”

A new measure for wireless power transfer

Thursday, October 8, 2015

Supporting the construction of highly efficient transfer links through a real-time kQ display

Wireless power transfer has many promising applications, such as contactless powering, electric vehicles, and energy harvesting. To construct a wireless power-transfer system, a "wireless transfer coupler" is necessary to deliver the energy from a high-frequency power source to a load, with no physical contact.

Wireless Communications Technologies In Healthcare Market – Global Industry Analysis, Trends And Forecast 2015 – 2023

Wednesday, October 7, 2015

According to a recent market study published by Transparency Market Research (TMR), Technology has been pivotal factor for transformation of the global health care sector. Over the last decade, advancements in the electronics and information technology have occurred at a rapid pace leading to the development of innovative wireless devices and supporting technologies. These changes have enabled easy communication even at the remotest place.

Renesas Electronics Delivers R-Car W2R 5.9 GHz Band Automotive Wireless Communication SoC for Vehicle-to-Vehicle and Vehicle-to-Infrastructure Communication (V2X)

Tuesday, September 29, 2015

Business Wire -- Renesas Electronics Corporation (TSE: 6723), a premier supplier of advanced semiconductor solutions, today announced the R-Car W2R system-on-a-chip (SoC), the first member of the new Renesas R-Car Family of devices developed specifically for V2X applications. The new automotive wireless communication SoC is designed for Vehicle-to-Vehicle (V2V) and Vehicle-to-Infrastructure (V2I) communication in the 5.9-gigahertz (GHz) band.

Verizon, Qualcomm set to supply controversial unlicensed LTE starting next year

Thursday, September 24, 2015

by Stephen Lawson

Verizon and Qualcomm are on track to extend LTE networks into Wi-Fi frequencies by the end of next year despite a heated controversy over whether that would slow down wireless LANs. 

Verizon will start field trials of LTE-Unlicensed in October, aiming for a commercial launch next year, executives said during a briefing at the company's Innovation Center in San Francisco on Friday. Qualcomm demonstrated chips for mobile devices and small cells and said they would show up in products around the middle of 2016.

Poor Wi-Fi Management to Cost Mobile Operators $18bn

Wednesday, September 23, 2015

Research released today by XCellAir, an expert in Wi-Fi Quality of Experience (QoE), has revealed that operators could fail to capture up to $18bn of opportunity cost if they continue to poorly manage unregulated spectrum.

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