News

TowerJazz and UC San Diego Demonstrate Best in Class 5G Mobile Transmit-Receive Chips with Greater than 12 Gbps Data Rates

Thursday, February 23, 2017

NEWPORT BEACH and SAN DIEGO, Calif., Feb. 23, 2017 – TowerJazz, the global specialty foundry leader, and the University of California San Diego, a recognized leader for microwave, millimeter-wave, mixed-signal RFICs, and phased arrays, demonstrate for the first time a greater than 12 Gbps, 5G phased-array chip set.  This chip set demonstrates that products can be fabricated today to meet the emerging 5G telecommunications standards for the next wave of worldwide mobile communications. The chipset operates at 28 to 31 GHz, a new communications band planned for release by the FCC.

'Near-perfect' broadband absorber invented

Thursday, February 9, 2017

By Liezel Labios, UC San Diego

Transparent window coatings that keep buildings and cars cool on sunny days. Devices that could more than triple solar cell efficiencies. Thin, lightweight shields that block thermal detection.

These are potential applications for a thin, flexible, light-absorbing material developed by engineers at the University of California, San Diego.

CES 2017: Can a Self-Steering Antenna Fix Both Wi-Fi and TV Reception Issues?

Tuesday, January 17, 2017

By Tekla S. Perry

Posted 

CES 2017 wasn’t the show of the shiny new product. Wearables drew yawns, TV manufacturers spent more time talking about how to install their products on consumer walls than about the products themselves, and the lines to try on VR headsets were surprisingly short. Without the distraction of the next possibly big thing, it was easy to focus on the frustrations of the things we have now.

5G at 60 GHz sets data rate record at 2 Gbps at 300 m, 4 Gbps at 100 m

Tuesday, December 6, 2016

Keysight Technologies with the University of California San Diego have announced the longest bidirectional phased-array link in the 60 GHz band. At a link distance of 300 m, the 32-element array achieved a data rate of greater than 2 Gbps over all scan angles up to ±45 degrees.

Data rates were 4 Gbps at 100 m and 500 Mbps at 800 m over most scan angles. Initial tests by a leading wireless provider suggest the system can deliver content to eight homes at a time at up to 300 m.

Keysight Technologies, UC San Diego Collaborate to Prove Viability of 5G Communication with Record-Setting Data Rates of 2 Gbps at 300 m, 4 Gbps at 10

Monday, December 5, 2016

Keysight Technologies, Inc. (NYSE: KEYS), with the University of California San Diego (www.ece.ucsd.edu) today announced the world’s longest bidirectional phased-array link in the 60 GHz band. At a link distance of 300 m, the 32-element array achieved a data rate of greater than 2 Gbps over all scan angles up to ±45 degrees. Data rates were 4 Gbps at 100 m and 500 Mbps at 800 m over most scan angles. Initial tests by a leading wireless provider suggest the system can deliver content to eight homes at a time at up to 300 m.

The Secret (Code) for Getting Kids Excited About Engineering

Friday, October 7, 2016

San Diego, Calif., Oct. 7, 2016 — You can find publications written by Electrical and Computer Engineering Professor Pamela Cosman in the IEEE Transactions on Information Theory, the International Journal of Computer Vision and, as of this past May, in the children’s section of the UC San Diego bookstore.

Chaos could provide the key to enhanced wireless communications

Tuesday, August 16, 2016

Chaos, somewhat ironically, has one clear attribute: random-like, apparently unpredictable, behavior. However recent work shows that that unpredictable behavior could provide the key to effective and efficient wireless communications.

Flexible Wearable Electronic Skin Patch Offers New Way to Monitor Alcohol Levels

Tuesday, August 9, 2016

By Liezel Labios

Engineers at the University of California San Diego have developed a flexible wearable sensor that can accurately measure a person’s blood alcohol level from sweat and transmit the data wirelessly to a laptop, smartphone or other mobile device. The device can be worn on the skin and could be used by doctors and police officers for continuous, non-invasive and real-time monitoring of blood alcohol content.

Pages